The Employee Experience Part I: Onboarding, Culture and Benefits

We all know that from a human resources standpoint, it makes good sense to take good care of your employees. But have you ever considered the economic impact in fostering a positive employee experience? An essential resource and economic driver of your business, employees should be treated as critical stakeholders in both public and private sectors. 
Recently, Canada announced its lowest unemployment level in documented history, with the rate falling to a record low of 5.4 percent. As many as 27,700 new jobs in May were attributed to this dip however, there’s much to be said about the rise in self-employment and the diversion from the standard 9-5. According to Stats Canada, the number of self-employed workers rose 61,500, while the number of employees fell by 33,800. This statistic should be of concern to many employers. 
Echoing these sentiments, Intuit had also predicted that by 2020, 45% of the Canadian workforce would be self-employed. That being said, if you’ve never looked at investing some time and resources into improving upon your current employee experience from A to Z, you might want to consider this a gentle word of caution to enhance your existing model in the workplace, and give this two part series a thoughtful read. 

Onboarding 
As early as a job offer is made, employers can provide a motivating start to the beginning of a successful career. Small gestures like greeting the new hire on their first day, giving them a tour and introducing them to other staff can make new employees feel welcome and comfortable right out of the gate. When onboarding a new hire, it’s also good practice to have an employee onboarding checklist which can help to streamline the process. According to research conducted by The Aberdeen Group and TalentWise, it takes an average of eight months for new employees to become full productive. Clear and open communication is key to helping them get to know the organization and to identify their own role quickly.

Culture
While having clearly identified roles will enhance flow of communication, it will also promote a healthy team culture in the workplace. Nurturing an atmosphere where employees feel like they are part of a team and feel encouraged to progress can effectively boost morale and minimize employee turnover. Some ways to cultivate a healthy team culture include group volunteering, planning workplace retreats, or offering to cover the cost of additional training or learning opportunities for career advancement.

Benefits
It would be a mistake to underestimate the leverage employers can have by offering insurance benefits to their people. Not only does it attract quality talent, but it’s also a proven strategy in employee retention. Employers that support the well-being of their staff, demonstrate genuine concern about their health and happiness which in turn can lead to increased productivity. Workplace benefits also offer a competitive advantage that self-employed folks will admit to missing. 

Read The Employee Experience Part II: Wellness at Work, Ongoing Education, Exit Interview.

 

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